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obs: video and footage authorized by the Indian potiguras.
As in most indigenous groups located in the Northeast, toré is an important ritual practice, able to mark internal differences, projecting groups in contact situations. In the case of the Potiguara, the toré is usually held in the commemorations of the Indian Day (April 19), being considered as a “sacred ritual” that celebrates the friendship between the different villages, enhancing the feeling of group and nation. It is a dance that is in the own perception and representation of the collective tradition, being, therefore, an essential element for them to think like possessors of a past The toré is opened with the speech of the cacique affirming the importance of that ritual for the tradition. Then everyone is on their knees and heads low, making a silent prayer (our father is our Christian), at that moment people stand in three circles: the smallest in the center are the “players” of zabumba and bagpipe and which “pulls the cantiga”; in the other circle, a little bigger, are the children and adolescents participating with the dance; and in the third, the greatest of all, the Indians (men and women), dressed or not in Toré costumes, participate in dance singing, dancing and playing the maracá. The general cacique remains among the circles, while the “village chiefs” now stand in the third circle, sometimes accompanying the “general cacique,” all with maracas in their hands, dancing and singing, always in circular movements clockwise. gaita, the Toré begins, while “a line” is opened with the song that “calls the caboclos and the owners of the house for their obligations” and closed with the singing of Guarapirá on the beach (see Maria Fogo dancing the Toré since childhood and his father was one of the masters). After the toré is closed, still in the same position, the participants dance coco-de-roda, but the circles are enlarged to the extent that the people who were not in the proper clothes of the toré also participate in the coco-de-roda .

The lyrics of the cantigas evoke cosmological elements linked to Catholic religiosity (Trindade, São Miguel, Santos Reis), to the sea, to activities of survival (fishing), to events (war – arrow of the tapuio canindé) and beings of nature (guarapirá, orange, fish, water) and to mythical figures (tapuia coronga and tapuio canindé), besides jurema. Unlike other indigenous groups, there is no ritual use of drink produced with jurema; the drinks consumed are catuaba and cachaça.

In the specific case of the toré performed on the day of the Indian in ouricouri of the São Francisco village, there is sharing of meat and drink, revealing the position of the “caboclos do Sítio” organizers as hosts and the Indians of other villages as “guests.

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